History and Importance of Good Friday

Happy Good Friday 2016 to all. This year Good Friday is celebrated on 25th march 2016. lets see some of the importance of good friday here. Good Friday is a Christian religious holiday commemorating the crucifixion of Jesus Christ and his death at Calvary. The holiday is observed during Holy Week as part of the Paschal Triduum on the Friday preceding Easter Sunday, and may coincide with the Jewish observance of Passover. It is also known as Holy Friday, Great Friday, Black Friday,[1][2][3] or Easter Friday,[4][5] though the last term properly refers to the Friday in Easter week.

Good Friday is a widely instituted legal holiday in many national governments around the world, including in most Western countries (especially among Anglican and Catholic nations) as well as in 12 U.S. states.[6] Some countries, such as Germany, have laws prohibiting certain acts, such as dancing and horse racing, that are seen as profaning the solemn nature of the day
People send Good friday wishes images wishes and more stuffs on this day. In the United States, Good Friday is not a government holiday at the federal level; however, individual states, counties and municipalities may observe the holiday. Good Friday is a state holiday in Connecticut,[60] Delaware,[61] Florida,[62] Hawaii,[63] Indiana,[64] Kentucky (half day),[65] Louisiana,[66] New Jersey,[67] North Carolina,[68] North Dakota,[69] Tennessee[70] and Texas.[71] State and local government offices and courts are closed, as well as some banks and postal offices in these states, and in those counties and municipalities where Good Friday is observed as a holiday. Good Friday is also a holiday in the U.S. territories of Guam,[72] U.S. Virgin Islands[73] and Puerto Rico.[74]

The stock markets are closed on Good Friday[75][76] but the foreign exchange and bond trading markets open for a partial business day.[77][78] Most retail stores remain open, while some of them may close early. Public schools and universities are often closed on Good Friday, either as a holiday of its own, or part of spring break. The postal service operates, and banks regulated by the federal government do not close for Good Friday.[79] In some governmental contexts Good Friday has been referred to by a generic name, particularly “spring holiday”,[80][81][82] presumably to avoid accusations of violating the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, although neither the word “good” nor “Friday” describes any particular religion.

Valentines Day 2016

Valentine’s Day, also known as Saint Valentine’s Day or the Feast of Saint Valentine,[1] is a celebration observed on February 14 each year. It is celebrated in many countries around the world, although it is not a public holiday in most of them.

St. Valentine’s Day began as a liturgical celebration of one or more early Christian saints named Valentinus. Several martyrdom stories were invented for the various Valentines that belonged to February 14, and added to later martyrologies.[2] A popular hagiographical account of Saint Valentine of Rome states that he was imprisoned for performing weddings for soldiers who were forbidden to marry and for ministering to Christians, who were persecuted under the Roman Empire. According to legend, during his imprisonment, he healed the daughter of his jailer, Asterius. An embellishment to this story states that before his execution he wrote her a letter signed “Your Valentine” as a farewell.[3] Saint Valentine’s Day is an official feast day in the Anglican Communion,[4] as well as in the Lutheran Church.[5] Some part, but not all of the Eastern Orthodox Church also celebrates Saint Valentine’s Day, albeit on July 6 and July 30, the former date in honor of the Roman presbyter Saint Valentine, and the latter date in honor of Hieromartyr Valentine, the Bishop of Interamna (modern Terni). In Greek Orthodox Church and other Churches of the Ecumenical Patriarchate, no Saint Valentine exists, nor venerated.

The day was first associated with romantic love in the circle of Geoffrey Chaucer in the High Middle Ages, when the tradition of courtly love flourished. In 18th-century England, it evolved into an occasion in which lovers expressed their love for each other by presenting flowers, offering confectionery, and sending greeting cards (known as “valentines”). In Europe, Saint Valentine’s Keys are given to lovers “as a romantic symbol and an invitation to unlock the giver’s heart”, as well as to children, in order to ward off epilepsy (called Saint Valentine’s Malady).[6] Valentine’s Day symbols that are used today include the heart-shaped outline, doves, and the figure of the winged Cupid. Since the 19th century, handwritten valentines have given way to mass-produced greeting cards